EPISODE 98 – TELL THEM EVERYTHING NOW, WITH NAHSHON DION

For our 98th installment (originally recorded May 29th, 2022), Nahshon and I discuss yours truly’s roots in Los Angeles, the L.A. mayor’s race, the L.A. County Sheriff’s office, and even Acapulco restaurant. Nahshon Dion is a multi-talented, award-winning creative nonfiction writer, teaching artist, creative director, executive producer, and arts patron from Pasadena, California. She hosts TRANSBRATIONS, a YouTube show, whose next guest, on June 21st, features Writer and Professor Elmaz Abinader, co-founder of Voices of Our Nation Arts Foundation (VONA).

*It was Toni Morrison–not Angela Davis–in a conversation with Angela Davis, who noted the abundance of libraries in the United States per capita compared to the rest of ‘the West’s’ states and nations.*

*Set the Night on Fire: L.A. in the Sixties was authored by Mike Davis and Jon Weiner–not Weinstein–in 2020.

J.T.

Making A Neighborhood – The Substack

From Samanta Helou Hernandez, the creator of This Side of Hoover, and esteemed friend and neighbor:

‘Many of you have asked how you can support the work of This Side of Hoover and @jimbotimes. Well here’s your chance: @jimbotimes@alirachelpearl, and I are launching a newsletter all about what it means to make a neighborhood. We’ll be sharing original photo essays, cultural criticism,  local histories, and reflections on community making in an effort to not only document our rapidly changing neighborhood, but to connect the struggles and resilience of our area to neighborhoods across the city, state, and country.

This newsletter grew out of our 2021 project “Making Our Neighborhood: Redlining, Gentrification, and Housing in East Hollywood.” We wanted to create a platform to continue engaging in this topic long term. Our goal is to deepen people’s understanding of their neighborhoods, whether you live in East Hollywood or on the East Coast. By becoming a paid subscriber you’re supporting our ongoing work examining both the cultural and political implications of racially discriminatory practices, urban planning, gentrification, and community solidarity.

The newsletter launches on March 4th. To celebrate we’ll be hosting an IG live that day to discuss the new project and answer any questions!  Subscribe to “Making A Neighborhood” at the link in any of our bios to receive our weekly posts.’

J.T.

Origin Stories: Charlotta Bass, The California Eagle

When you write for justice in Los Angeles or any major city, you can bet handily that Black communities did it first, as shown by the work of Charlotta Bass, photographed here circa 1929 at The California Eagle’s printing shop, which was once located at 1607 East 103rd street in Watts.

Bass was the sole editor-in-chief of The California Eagle, which was originally known as The Owl; The Owl had been founded by John J. Neimore, a Black man originally from Texas who started The Owl in Los Angeles in 1879 while still in his teen years. That is, two whole years before even the L.A. Times itself was established!

The California Eagle‘s printing shop, which was once located at 1607 East 103rd street in Watts; Photo Courtesy of USC Digital Libraries

From 1913 to 1951, as editor of L.A.’s first Black owned newspaper, Bass published tirelessly in the name of housing, racial, and economic justice. Among many other issues, Bass published writing against racial covenants, against the KKK in Los Angeles, in opposition to FDR’s internment of Japanese Americans, and also in opposition to the unjust prosecution of Chicano youth alleged to be members of the 38th street “gang” in the infamous “Sleepy Lagoon” case.

The California Eagle as a publication survived until 1964, when it was sold. But despite the paper’s eventual folding, it still served as a premier cornerstone for Black and Immigrant voices in Los Angeles over four decades, that is, pre-Civil Rights movement, pre-Black Panther Party, and pre-Chicano and Asian American movements in the city.

This blog thus recognizes Bass, Neimore, and every voice still to be heard for justice in Los Angeles over another century at stake.

J.T.