EPISODE 96 – WILLIAM J. ACEVES ON THE HISTORIC WATTS PEACE TREATY OF 1992

For Bloods, Crips, scholars, story-lovers, and more, William J. Aceves, law professor at California Western School of Law in San Diego, describes How four gangs in Watts brokered a historic peace treaty just days before the L.A. rebellion over the Rodney King verdict. That is, a treaty modeled after the 1949 Armistice agreement between Egypt and Israel! Which itself was largely organized by Ralph Bunche, an alum of Thomas Jefferson High School, the fourth oldest high school in Los Angeles. Aceves also chats with us about his article on amending the 1790 U.S. Constitution for its racist legacy, and even shouts out none other than Tommy’s Burgers on Beverly and Rampart; an instant classic convo all-around.

J.T.

black textile

The Twenty Largest Nations and their Populations (by millions): 1950 – 2100

Rank
1950
PopulationRank2000Population
1China554.81China1 275.2
2India357.62India1 016.9
3U.S.A.157.83U.S.A.285
4Russian Federation102.74Indonesia211.6
5Japan83.65Brazil171.8
6Indonesia79.56Russian Federation145.6
7Germany68.47Pakistan142.7
8Brazil548Bangladesh138
9United Kingdom49.89Japan127
10Italy47.110Nigeria114.7
11France41.811Mexico98.9
12Bangladesh41.812Germany82.3
13Pakistan39.713Viet Nam78.1
14Ukraine37.314Philippines75.7
15Nigeria29.815Turkey68.3
16Spain2816Egypt67.8
17Mexico27.717Iran66.4
18Viet Nam27.418Ethiopia65.6
19Poland24.819Thailand60.9
20Egypt21.820France59.3
Rank2050PopulationRank2100Population
1India1 531.41India1 458.4
2China1 395.22China1 181.5
3U.S.A.408.73U.S.A.437.2
4Pakistan348.74Pakistan408.5
5Indonesia293.85Nigeria302.5
6Nigeria258.56Indonesia272.8
7Bangladesh254.67Bangladesh259.9
8Brazil233.18Ethiopia222.2
9Ethiopia1719Brazil212.4
10Congo, DR151.610Congo, DR203.3
11Mexico140.211Uganda167.1
12Egypt127.412Yemen144.2
13Philippines12713Egypt131.8
14Viet Nam117.714Philippines128.8
15Japan109.715Mexico128.1
16Iran105.516Viet Nam110.2
17Uganda103.217Niger98.6
18Russian Federation101.518Iran98.2
19Turkey97.819Turkey90.3
20Yemen84.420Afghanistan90.3
Source: United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division, World Population to 2300, 2002
Source: Wikimedia Commons

It truly hasn’t been long since the days of Manifest Destiny in the mid-19th century led to an expansion project that violently spread from some 26 states in North America to the west coast’s former Mexican territories. But for a child born in the United States today, before they turn 30 years old, the world and their country will look much different than it did for their parents at that age, and entirely other-worldly from the time of their grandparents or great grandparents.

Consider that in 1950, just after the end of World War II, seven European nations occupied a place among the top 20 most populated states. By 2000, only three would remain in the top 20; by 205o, only the Russian Federation will remain on the list (and will be out of the list by 2100). The rest of the list will be occupied by Asian, African, and a handful of American nations, including the U.S., Brazil, and Mexico. But consider as well that by 2050 the U.S. will be a majority-minority” nation (the first of its kind), where although whites will likely remain the largest single group (47%), there will be more Black, Native, Latinx, Asian and other citizens (53%) in the country altogether.

It’s also fascinating that by 2100, the people and culture of nations such as Pakistan and Afghanistan, which have occupied the mind of many U.S. citizens as war-torn nations, will nonetheless continue expanding to outsize most other nations across the world. Just as well, it’s mind-boggling that the Philippines, which maintains a total area of some 115,800 square miles, is projected to count more people in its boundaries than Mexico, which holds a total area of some 761,600 square miles by 2100. Similarly, Yemen, which is one of the poorest nations in the Middle East–and which since 2015 has been locked in a war with Saudi Arabia, or one of the richest countries in the region–will also climb the ranks over the next 30 years to make the top 20 list; and Yemen will be 13th on the list by the end of the century.

The world is thus on track, or “destined,” to become only more diverse as the 21st century unfolds, making the development of peace and understanding between diversities more important with each day. In the spirit of friendly competition, however, the Californians–or Californianxs–in the vicinity need not to worry: The Golden State will remain the largest in the U.S. by 2050, when 48% of the state’s population is projected to be Latinx compared to the group’s current rate of 39%.

Source: Animated Stats Channel on YouTube.

So many numbers, and such little time, but we still make the time in Los Angeles.

J.T.

EPISODE 95 – OSCAR ZARATE ON FREE PUBLIC TRANSIT IN L.A.

Oscar Zarate (@outta_papeles) schools us on unincorporated Los Angeles, the L.A. County Tenants’ Bill of Rights, fareless transit, and more. Oscar’s citations include an analysis showing that fareless transit could reduce over 60 billion in vehicle miles traveled (VMT) in L.A. County, as well as this study showing fareless transit’s effect on Metro bus and subway ridership during the pandemic. To get involved in the campaign for free public transit in L.A., visit http://bit.ly/farefree.

*There are also not 90 unincorporated communities in L.A. County, but at least 124, according to this data.*

J.T.