EPISODE 42 – HOW TO ROB THE NEIGHBORHOOD

In our 42nd episode, we catch up with Podcaster, Publisher, and Creator of #LosCuentos, J.T., on this new, yet timeless industry still burgeoning all around communities of color in Los Angeles and major cities everywhere. Written work quoted for this episode includes Carey McWilliams’ Factories in the Field (1940) Richard Rothstein’s The Color of Law (2017), and J.T. The L.A. Storyteller‘sJIMBOTIMES.COM. Also, to keep up with JIMBO TIMES’ next special venture for L.A., find us on PATREON at patreon.com/jimbotimes.

J.T.

That time L.A. City Council Declined Federal money for Public Housing

L.A. Post World War II was defined by Anti-Blackness. After the fight against Nazis, it was time to fight against housing for ‘Negroes.’

The California Eagle on November 28, 1946; Courtesy of the Internet Archive
They said there were only dirty N—, Mexicans, Chinks, and Japs in those poor districts, and they ought to be made to get along the best they could.“; The California Eagle on November 28, 1946; Courtesy of the Internet Archive
The California Eagle on November 28, 1946; Courtesy of the Internet Archive

When, however, a survey was finally made it was found that those who lived in the slum districts were not only Negroes, Mexicans, and Japanese…’Sixty five percent of the slum homes were occupied by white families,’ [according to the L.A. housing official]…And we found that many of those houses were owned by the people who objected to slum clearance. If it had not been for these obstructions, he declared, Central avenue could have had ten more housing projects than it has.

During the emergency housing program for war workers, the same objections against minority groups prevailed. And last year when ‘private enterprise’ began building, only 1 percent was made available for Negroes.”

J.T.

You’re Invited to Housing In East Hollywood, with J.T.

Talk will be free. Redlining was an official government policy of marking areas as “undesirable” for investment based on the racial makeup of their residents, which continues affecting Black and immigrant areas in Los Angeles today. If you’re interested but not on Instagram, contact the site here to learn more.

J.T.