EPISODE 25 – LATINE OR LATINX

In our twenty-fifth episode, we chat with Madison Felman-Panagotacos, a researcher and doctoral candidate in the Spanish & Portuguese department at UCLA. Madison tells us about her teaching Latine instead of Latinx during her seminars for language students at UCLA, and how terms like “elles” can and do make a positive difference for non-binary people in the Latinx community. Check out the article we refer to from the New Yorker at this link: Who Are You Calling Latinx? And find Madison on Twitter at @mad_tacos_.

J.T.

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Pandemic in Los Angeles: Day 41

I want to take a moment through this series to recognize the myriad of teachers, professors, and other educators in Los Angeles whose herculean efforts to continue providing instruction to the many students relying on them are a clear show of the profound work they take part in on a daily basis during circumstances of all kind.

Only yesterday, I spoke briefly with an instructor who informed me that they “have no weekends,” as they do the work of lecturing, advising, and grading for three different classes with more than two dozen learners in each class all by themselves.

I marveled at the heroism in the professor’s voice, unbeknownst even to them as they told me of their troubles. Then I remembered a line by another professor, one of my favorites, from many years ago:

“Being a professor, is just like being in college for the rest of your life.”

Of course, it made perfect sense when she said it. And I can still remember thinking to myself, I can do that too.

So guess who’s looking at a credentialing program this morning. Our teachers need help! Let’s assure them more support is on the way.

J.T.

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Pandemic in Los Angeles: Day 38

I am driven by the challenge to not only survive, but to thrive all across Los Angeles, even during this most unusual time. The fact of the matter is that I love challenging myself, taking on one task after another, and finding out just how I’ll get through.

I know I’m doing it all for a story, or for a cuento, which I will get to share with many generations for many days to come. To that end, it’s my great pleasure to announce that I’ve officially received my Certificate of Clearance from the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing.

In the long term, the certificate allows me to pursue a teaching credential to become an official teacher in the state of California sometime within the next five years. In the shorter term, it assures that once the students get back to school later this year, I’ll be available to support their community on stand-by as a Substitute teacher.

It boggles my mind to think that I could actually do this. For the longest time, even while I believed that education was a world I was destined to be a part of, I struggled to find exactly what my role in it could be. This was due to a number of factors, including many jobs lost, many other jobs gained, and at some point as a result the notion that perhaps I had very little to offer my community after all.

But like the magical screen-printer from Compton whose talent allows me to pursue another dream for myself through Los Angeles, it’s true that at the end of the day, every human being has something totally unique and valuable to offer the world.

In turn, whether I am a substitute or a fully-certified teacher for students in Los Angeles and across California, what I can be certain of is this: I will give it my all to make our time an extraordinary one.

J.T.

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