How to Beat Summer 2019: Part III

Los Cuentos with J.T; Summer 2019

Alright, so you made it past How to Beat Summer 2019 Parts I & II and are now nearing the finish line. However, if you think the third and final part of this series will be easier because you’ve gotten through the first two lists, you’re in for a surprise.

1. START YOUR OWN BUSINESS OR ENTERPRISE. To some, this may sound “too far advanced,” but it can be done in so many ways that it’s actually much easier than it appears. You can start a band, or you can start a rap career. You can start painting, illustrating or photographing the world you live in, or you can start making delicious soup out of it; you can start on your path to becoming a motivational speaker, or you can start on your destiny as a fashion designer. But first, you need to start by getting organized, which is where your outline comes in. Depending on your choice, your outline will answer one of the following questions from this list:

I. What will your podcast talk about to make it unique?
II. How will your raps set you apart from the competition?
III. What will your paintings show about the importance of self-expression?
IV. What will your photo or drawing capture that the world needs to see?
V. What will the name of your soup kitchen be?
VI. What will your motivational speech sound like? Or, who will your ‘target audience’ be? (E.G. Youth, undocumented, queer communities, etc.)
VII. Who will your fashion design be for? (Same as above)

Your business can also be an idea from outside the list, but check with me first about it. No matter what the idea though, you’re going to need an outline explaining the mission of your business. For any questions on your outline, I’m just around the block.

2. RECORD YOUR FIRST PODCAST FOR YOUR BIZ. UPLOAD IT TO SOUNDCLOUD. HIT PUBLISH. Here, you’re not only going to create your own original content, but you’re also going to build a platform to showcase it like a pro. But wait, I can hear the doubts trickling in already: What are you going to record? Or, what if you record, but people think your podcast is silly? Or what if no one stops by to listen? These are the kinds of questions that many creators ask before starting something new, but the fact is that such questions just get in your way; they’re based on fear, not reality, and this is because we all have the ability to be creative in our unique way that others can learn from. Moreover, what you should really be concerned about is how if you’re not taking advantage of how quickly you can make your own podcast in 2019, that’s a way bigger loss than someone thinking your recordings are silly. And. Here’s. The. Best. Part:

This Summer 2019, if you’re up for this challenge on our list, I will show you how to make your own podcast. Wait, did someone say challenge? Like our Hat Challenge, or our New Hoodie Challenge? Yes, indeed, Youngs!

3. COMPLETE BOTH ITEMS ON THIS LIST TO WIN THE FIRST EVER BLACK & WHITE HOODIE BY J.T. That’s right. If you choose to start your rap career this Summer 2019, you’re not only going to write and record your verse, but you’re going to record your own podcast telling people more about your rap. The first step to building your podcast will be an outline. If you choose to start a soup kitchen, you’ll record a podcast describing your kitchen’s menu with details like how I’ve done with these posts.

To make things more interesting, you’ll also be choosing a pseudonym, or a mysterious online name specifically for this project, which in actuality is how a lot of the internet used to be, since a lot us were shy about our work when we were just starting out! Complete these steps, and I assure you that you’ll be the first student to ever WIN the First Black & White Hoodie by Jimbo Times.

SO, are you entering the challenge? Then get a MOVE ON! For all yours questions, try the new contact form to reach me. I can’t wait to see all your ideas!

J.T.

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Looking Ahead

I’ve got to say it makes me proud to introduce the first ever video feature on JIMBO TIMES, courtesy of The Plus Me Project!

The short video is part of a new chapter with The Project looking ahead to the next school-year, and a big shout out goes to Richard Kuo and Richard Reyes for taking the initiative!

Viewers, enjoy; and be sure to cheer us on as you can! We are all taking this next step together and it sure feels kinda big. </:)

J.T.

Rediscovering Los Angeles,

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Rampart Village, Los Angeles, CA

One of the best feelings in the world is discovering a new place where you know you’ll find yourself again because it’s somehow an integral part of you the instant you find yourself in its space. I felt this way the moment that I saw the radiant photo for JT, and I still feel this way about the site now, as I enter its 101st post with this text!

That feeling goes beyond the web-page though, as it extends across to so many of the places I find in my travels through the city. Earlier today I visited Miguel Contreras High School with The PLUS ME Project, and there was just such a brilliant sight there that I can still see it now: nestled just outside of downtown on 3rd street, the school has an absolutely magnificent view of another skyline besides downtown’s that a lot of L.A. aficionados aren’t as familiar with: that of Mount Baldy’s snow-covered mountain tops! It was galvanizing. And even now, to think that while I enjoyed the warmth of rich sunlight this morning in L.A., not far away there stood this an entirely polar universe of snow and temperatures below zero, I mean it was just humbling!

The world is so vast, but even for The L.A. Storyteller, there are moments where it feels like I’m just so crammed in by all the concrete and metal and fumes which surround me as I make my way through the city. Still, while it might be true that L.A.’s traffic can feel overwhelming at times, it’s also true that it just depends on the particular moment in which one finds themselves in.

For me today, as I stood on 3rd street in front of MCLC’s doors at 10:00 am, with the heavy morning commute out of the way and most people tucked into their offices, the entire place was free of traffic, noise, and the tensions that spring from these things. And as I took a breath before it all, it just dawned on me how no matter where we are we’re always just a small part of things there. The world and its movement are infinitely bigger than we are, but rather than sulking over this, it’s exciting to rejoice over any little bit of the universe that we get! And especially so if we get to stand amid sunshine and warmth on one end to muse at snow-covered mountain peaks on the other end!

And so it looks like I’ll have to go back to 3rd street soon, and not just for an appointment with the school there.

</:)

Dear Duarte,

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By Crown Prep Academy; Crown Prep, L.A.

Thank you for being here. Thank you for showing up. If your education now is anything like mine was back in the day, then it’s tough to go to school and do the work sometimes. The toughest thing in the world, even. And truthfully, ‘tough’ only begins to describe it.

Some days –when I was in your shoes– getting up in the morning to face the day felt like the chore from hell. Even now I can still remember what it felt like when my uniform seemed too worn out for another day of periods one through six, or what it felt like when my hair seemed too off for me to show up alongside my classmates with it. Similarly, I can still recall what it felt like when my stomach was grumbling too loudly for me to hear a teacher instructing me about the day’s lesson, or what it felt like when nothing major was really wrong, but when I just wanted to put on my earphones and listen to some music instead of roll call.

Most of all, I remember how unfair it felt to have to show up anyway, despite these things. And yet every morning, there my mom stood, ready to take me to school before the bell for homeroom rang.

In the same way, as the day went on, there Mrs. Weiss stood, ready to offer her guidance through fractions, divisions, exponents, and so much more. I didn’t quite get it at the time, but both my mom and Mrs. Weiss had plenty of other things to worry about then too. They may not have been concerned with haircuts or uniforms, but their problems were just as vivid and pulsing as mine, and their lives just as complicated. And somehow, despite these things, they still got up each morning as well. Why?

Continue reading “Dear Duarte,”