Poetry Day at the Cahuenga Branch Library


April 14th, 2018; 12:15 – 2:00 PM

It’s happening. After 27 years of splotching so many shoe-marks through the little pueblo of Los Angeles now branded by so many real estate signs as East Hollywood, which to me for so long has just been the place I call Home, I finally get to announce a major event in the neighborhood at which my dirty chucks and I can stand at the fore joined by fellow Angelenos and L.A. enthusiasts alike. Mark your calendars!

Poetry Day for Poetry Month is taking place at the Cahuenga Branch Public Library from 12:15 PM to 2:00 PM on Saturday, April 14th, 2018.

It is a major event. In the downstairs section of the library, and in conjunction with the library’s book sale that day as well as with support from the congruent Friends of Cahuenga chapter, I will be serving as emcee for an Open Mic celebration of April’s Poetry Month theme. The event will feature poets from Los Angeles, refreshments from the Friends, and of course, many of the library’s delicious books for sale.

If he were still with us, I’m confident that Roger King the chess coach would be proud. Roger passed on last year after a short battle with cancer, and although his games have been missed, this afternoon I could feel Roger’s local friendly spirit stamping through the classroom where the planning meeting with Cahuenga’s Friends was held, just like when the games took place there when Roger was still commandeering them.

Naturally, then, we’ve got our eyes on locals in the neighborhood for the big day, but every reader and supporter or friend of a friend of JT is now officially invited. There are also more details of the event to come, but for now consider yourself informed:

We are going to make you proud Los Angeles.


Hey J.T.,

I will have our monthly book review tomorrow evening. (I know it’s late; please don’t evict me!) But the wait will be worth it.

Until then!

Le Jimbo

Bridging the Gap

Almost a year ago to the tee, following a recommendation from a friend, I got my hands on a little book called City of Quartz by Mike Davis.

It felt like a brilliant discovery, since as early as the book’s first pages, one thing was clear: whether in discussing the international interests of downtown L.A.’s skyscrapers or rebellion through the streets of SouthCentral, City of Quartz’s Mike Davis was someone who cared about Los Angeles.

In turn, I went through a few of Quartz’s chapters on the site, and had a blast analyzing the roots of The City in response to the author’s perspectives on it.

But then, something happened.

It was a great but unpredictable time for me. On the one hand, I was having a lot of fun earning a little bit of money from freelance writing and photography, not to mention time with The Plus Me Project and The Beautiful Gate, but on the other hand, it wasn’t enough.

It’d been just a year since I graduated from college, and though JIMBO TIMES had taken me to Miami, when I got back from the trip I could see that if I wanted to keep going places I’d have to make some sacrifices.

I then did what so many of my peers did before me, as our families did before us: I found myself a job, earned a little bit of pay, and called it a day.

It was good: I could finally help mom out at home on a more sustainable level, and I could also just help myself with anything from gas money to a new memory card for my camera.

But it was also tough: while I could see my time in the service industry with Starbucks as something honorable and even brilliant, I also felt that it was a significant digression from my interests in work for youth, education, and of course, the writing!

Work with the company was also exhausting; standing on my feet for so many hours of the day made it so that when I got home I found myself too worn out to keep my eyes up through a book as dense as Mike Davis’s Quartz.

I had to let it go, then. And let it go I did.

I told myself I’d get back to the book and the rest of J.T. soon enough, but then the days passed, and then some other projects came up, and then:


From one week to the next, I got wrapped up in the cha-ching noise, numbers, and the framework of it all; even if I wasn’t earning much, there was this rhythm to it that I respected — and, who am I kidding — it was a matter of getting some bread.

But the thing is: even if it was all well and fine to work and work hard, it also took time from The L.A. Storyteller, and I couldn’t just let this go.

In response, come January of this year I made some changes in an effort to regain the time I felt I’d lost with J.T. and was successful in doing so. Moreover, I was chosen for a special project with the InsideOUT Writers, and just like that: my framework expanded.

Contrary to a silent skepticism, J.T. was still growing after all; new seeds were being planted, and earlier seeds were blooming at last.

But there was still more: more I needed to give to JIMBO TIMES, and more which I needed to sort of get back to…like City of Quartz, L.A. Stories, and other extensions of the site not just for me personally, but for the kids.

On seeing this, I realized that I had to make some sacrifices again, but this time in the other direction; that is, in the original one.

I had to get back to myself.

And so I do.

Tonight it’s a bittersweet pleasure to announce that I’m finished with Starbucks at the end of July, and that my project with the InsideOUT Writers has grown into a precious part-time position with the organization.

It’s also a pleasure to announce that I’ll be picking up where I left off with City of Quartz over the next few weeks. The thing is, these pages are dedicated to The People of The City, and critical literature by those before us plays an integral part in just how the pages continue to form. I can’t just let this go, even when I do let it go.

As such, it’s about to get literary again, and so I hope The People are ready.

There’s too much going on in the world for us to neglect our voice in it. Plus, studies show that many of the kids from the neighborhood start to slump during the summer. But nah’, we choose to make the opposite true: this summer is now officially dedicated to reading, writing, and more work to uplift The People of L.A.

With more soon,